Rise
grand-bazaar:

Cote d’Ivoire - Acrobatic Dancers

grand-bazaar:

Cote d’Ivoire - Acrobatic Dancers

(via negativnein)

odofemi:

Wood carvings in the Erinle shrine in Ilobu, Nigeria.

odofemi:

Wood carvings in the Erinle shrine in Ilobu, Nigeria.

(via negativnein)

(via negativnein)

pregnantfilm:

EYES OV TORTURE

pregnantfilm:

EYES OV TORTURE

(via neuadult)

theunderestimator:

July 1972, issue #133 of “International Times” (IT) underground UK newspaper.

theunderestimator:

July 1972, issue #133 of “International Times” (IT) underground UK newspaper.

(via lesbianhorse)

dorkbraindork:

“I will let you down”

dorkbraindork:

“I will let you down”

(via benzodaze)

Because the world is so full of death and horror, I try again and again to console my heart and pick the flowers that grow in the midst of hell.
— Hermann Hesse, Narcissus and Goldmund (via desanguinea)

(via infiniteregress-)

flesh-hierarchy:

Tony Wakeford and Douglas P. photo take. during the first sessions of recording “The Guilty Have No Pride” album.

flesh-hierarchy:

Tony Wakeford and Douglas P. photo take. during the first sessions of recording “The Guilty Have No Pride” album.

(via total-abuse)


After the fall of France, Winston Churchill vowed to “set Europe ablaze.” To that end, British secret agents were equipped with an assortment of disguised explosive devices that would have made even James Bond jealous — bombs that were made to look like soap, shoes, bottles of chianti, bicycle pumps, suitcases — and even rats. But the most exotic device was the “explosive rat”. A hundred of the rodents were procured by an SOE officer posing as a student needing them for laboratory experiments. The rats were skinned, filled with plastic explosive, and sewn up. The idea was to place a rat among coal beside a boiler. When they were spotted, they would immediately be thrown on to the fire, causing a huge explosion.That was the theory. As one of the SOE files records: “This device caused considerable trouble to the enemy, but not quite in the way that was intended.” The Germans intercepted the container of dead rats before they could be used for “operational purposes”. But all was not lost. According to an SOE report, their discovery had an “extraordinary moral effect”: the rodents were exhibited at all German military schools, prompting a hunt for “hundreds of rats the enemy believed were distributed on the continent”.
SOE concluded: “The trouble caused to them was a much greater success to us than if the rats had actually been used.”

After the fall of France, Winston Churchill vowed to “set Europe ablaze.” To that end, British secret agents were equipped with an assortment of disguised explosive devices that would have made even James Bond jealous — bombs that were made to look like soap, shoes, bottles of chianti, bicycle pumps, suitcases — and even rats. But the most exotic device was the “explosive rat”. A hundred of the rodents were procured by an SOE officer posing as a student needing them for laboratory experiments. The rats were skinned, filled with plastic explosive, and sewn up. The idea was to place a rat among coal beside a boiler. When they were spotted, they would immediately be thrown on to the fire, causing a huge explosion.

That was the theory. As one of the SOE files records: “This device caused considerable trouble to the enemy, but not quite in the way that was intended.” The Germans intercepted the container of dead rats before they could be used for “operational purposes”. But all was not lost. According to an SOE report, their discovery had an “extraordinary moral effect”: the rodents were exhibited at all German military schools, prompting a hunt for “hundreds of rats the enemy believed were distributed on the continent”.

SOE concluded: “The trouble caused to them was a much greater success to us than if the rats had actually been used.”

(via 100rats)

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